Apr 24, 2024  
2017-18 Hamilton Holt School Graduate 
    
2017-18 Hamilton Holt School Graduate [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Master of Arts (Clinical Mental Health Counseling) Additional Information


Graduate Studies in Counseling Program Policies:

Academic Policies

Transfer Credits

Student Evaluation Sequence

Student Progress and Reflections Self-Report

Probation and Dismissal

Practicum and Internship Experience

 

The Theory of Counseling Paper

The Master Therapist Series

Graduation Requirements

ADMISSIONS  

TUITION AND FEES  

ACADEMIC POLICIES  

 

Academic Policies

  • Upon acceptance, all degree-seeking students must elect either the three- or four-year Program of Study. Students may shift sequence with the approval of their advisor and the department chair. A revised Program of Study form must be completed by the student in consultation with their academic advisor and submitted for approval to the department chair prior to changing sequence plans.
  • Students in their first year of enrollment must complete a minimum of 10 individual counseling sessions with a licensed mental health professional. Upon completion of the requirement, students are eligible to take a second year of classes, providing they have submitted a letter from the therapist documenting completion of the 10 sessions on the letterhead of the licensed professional. Additional information about this requirement is in the program’s Student Handbook.
  • Students must attend one meeting of the Florida Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage and Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling prior to graduation from the program. Details are provided in the program’s Student Handbook.
  • Students must maintain membership in an approved national professional association and also maintain professional liability insurance at all times while enrolled in the graduate program. Details are provided in the program’s Student Handbook.
  • Degree-seeking students must complete at least five (5) courses in an academic year in order to remain in the program. Students must maintain a grade point average of “B” (3.0). Students whose averages fall below 3.0 are placed on academic probation. Failure to bring the average up to 3.0 during the next semester of registration will result in academic dismissal. No more than six (6) hours of “C” (2.0) work may be included as degree credit. A course may only be repeated once. A grade of “F” or “WF” will result in academic dismissal.
  • Students may request a one-year leave of absence from the program by submitting a written request to the department chair. Students returning from an approved leave of absence may be required to update their catalog year and will be subject to current student policies. If a student on an approved leave of absence does not return to the program within one year (three semesters), the student must apply for readmission.
  • Students who withdraw or are dismissed from the program and are not on an approved leave of absence must reapply for admission. All new student application requirements will apply.
  • All credit applied to a degree program must be earned within six (6) years of the first registration.
  • Faculty approve all academic policies for Graduate Studies programs.

Transfer Credits

Degree-seeking students may apply for transfer of up to nine (9) semester hours of graduate-level coursework from other CACREP or CACREP equivalent accredited programs by filing an Application for Transfer Credit form, which is available at http://r-net.rollins.edu/holt/counseling/forms.html. Transfer credit is approved only when the following conditions are met:

  • Before a transfer of credit can be officially recorded, students must have completed the initial twelve (12) hours of required coursework.
  • Courses submitted for transfer must have been completed within the six years prior to graduation from the Rollins Graduate Studies program.
  • Before taking a course intended for transfer, a student must submit the Application for Transfer Credit form and supply course syllabi and a course description from the institution’s course catalog that specifically describes course name, number, course requirements, and content. The student should attach a cover letter stating which course or courses the transferred courses will replace in the student’s program of studies and a rationale for the substitution. This material should be submitted to Holt Student Services.
  • Upon completion of the substitute course, a student must supply an official transcript that verifies that the course or courses being submitted for transfer were completed with a grade of “B” or better.
  • The department chair, core faculty and the instructor(s) primarily responsible for teaching the course(s) for which a substitution is proposed will determine if the transfer is appropriate. The proposed transfer must meet program training objectives. Courses will be approved for transfer only if there is substantial consistency between the proposed transfer course and the required course.
  • Given the training objectives and curriculum of the Clinical Mental Health Counseling degree, the following courses may NOT be substituted by a transferred course:

CPY 510 - Foundations in Clinical Mental Health Counseling 
CPY 520 - Group Dynamics and Process 
CPY 525 - Counseling Theories and Practice 
CPY 538 - Multicultural and Social Justice Counseling 
CPY 540 - Advanced Theory and Practice of Group Counseling 
PSY 660 - Pre-Practicum in Mental Health Counseling 
PSY 661 - Pre-Practicum in Social Justice and Advocacy 
PSY 680 - Practicum in a Clinical Mental Health Setting 
PSY 690 - Internship I in Clinical Mental Health Counseling 
PSY 695 - Internship II in a Clinical Mental Health Setting  

Student Evaluation Sequence

Every counselor education training program has an ethical responsibility to evaluate students to protect the public from impaired practitioners. Faculty have a gate-keeping responsibility both to honor their commitment to the students they admit and to protect future clients who will be served by those who graduate. For this reason, formative and summative evaluation of each student is an ongoing process in the Graduate Studies in Counseling program. Students will be assessed at specific intervals and through several courses throughout the program. Additionally, student evaluation and feedback is considered an ongoing process that is intended to support student growth and development whenever necessary.

In compliance with the accreditation standards of the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), the program faculty systematically assess each student’s developmental progress throughout the program. The focus of the comprehensive assessment is the student’s academic status, including performance in academic work, clinical skill development, professional conduct, and personal growth. These qualities and behaviors are evaluated continuously throughout the program to determine appropriate student fit with the profession of clinical mental health counseling. Detailed descriptions of performance expectations of students are published in the Graduate Counseling Student Handbook.

First Year

  • A grade of “B-” or higher in CPY 525 - Counseling Theories and Practice  and in CPY 545 - Legal, Professional, and Ethical Issues in Counseling  
  • Maintenance of a grade point average of at least 3.0
  • Completion of at least ten (10) hours of individual counseling confirmed by submission of appropriate documentation by the end of the first year of study (see Graduate Counseling Student Handbook for designated due date)
  • Completion of 100 hours of field experience in fulfillment of PSY 660  requirements
  • Completion of the Student Progress Self-Reflection and Program of Study forms

Second Year

  • Maintenance of a grade point average of at least 3.0
  • Completion of the Student Progress Self-Reflections form
  • Completion of all coursework prior to beginning Practicum
  • Completion of 100 hours of field experience in fulfillment of PSY 661  requirements

Third Year (for Four-Year part-time Students)

  • Maintenance of a grade point average of at least 3.0
  • Completion of the Student Progress Self-Reflection and Program of Study forms
  • Completion of all coursework prior to beginning Practicum and Internship
  • Completion of remainder of field experience in fulfillment of PSY 661  requirements

Clinical Year for All Students

  • Application for Graduation completed during fall semester
  • Grade of B- or higher) for PSY 680  before taking PSY 690  
  • Grade of B- or higher) for PSY 690  before taking PSY 695  
  • Grade of B- or higher for PSY 695  in order to graduate
  • Confirmation of attendance at one meeting of the Florida Board of Clinical Social Work Marriage & Family Therapy, and Mental Health Counseling
  • Attendance at all three Master Therapist presentations and successful completion of the post-workshop learning assessment
  • Completion of the “My Theory of Counseling” paper with a rating of 4 or higher on all sections
  • Completion of Exit Reflections and Final Progress Self-Report

Student Progress and Reflections Self-Report

Prior to registration for fall semester, all students must complete student progress self-reflection and program of study forms. These forms must be completed in order to gain eligibility to attend classes beginning the fall semester. Both forms are to be submitted electronically to the department. Each report is reviewed by the student’s advisor, who represents it to the full faculty during the annual progress review of students held each September. Following this review session, students are encouraged to seek feedback from their advisors. When the review process indicates that a student’s performance may be in need of special attention or consideration, the advisor or department chair will meet with the student to explore appropriate options and alternatives.

Probation and Dismissal

In addition to assessment of graduate level achievement as reflected by course grades and performance on course assignments, additional areas of academic performance critical to counselor development are also evaluated over the course of the program. These include students’ professional conduct and ethical behavior, interpersonal and intrapersonal abilities, and clinical skill development. Specifically, the faculty evaluate behaviors that are likely to affect a trainee’s ability to engage in the expectations of the profession and effectively deliver clinical mental health services.

Professional dispositions and personal behaviors that impede or interfere with a student’s ability to fulfill professional responsibilities may indicate poor student-profession fit. For example, inability to relate to others interpersonally, resolve conflict, control emotional reactions and personal stress, exercise professional judgment, respect professional and personal boundaries, or inhibit disturbing personal attributes may be cause for remediation or dismissal from the program. Additional indicators of professional impairment include an inability or unwillingness to maintain professional standards or develop skills to an acceptable level of competency. Expectations for student conduct are detailed in the program’s Student Handbook.

In keeping with the 2014 American Counseling Association Code of Ethics (Code F.8.d.), Counselor educators may require students to address any personal concern that have the potential to affect professional competency. Additionally, according to Code F.9.b., faculty are to remain: “aware of and address the inability of some students to achieve counseling competencies. Counselor educators do the following:

  1. assist students in securing remedial assistance when needed,
  2. seek professional consultation and document their decision to dismiss or refer students for assistance, and
  3. Ensure that students have recourse in a timely manner to address decisions requiring them to seek assistance or to dismiss them and provide students with due process according to institutional policies and procedures.”

Failure to meet program requirements and expectations as outlined above are handled on a case-by-case basis. When significant concerns arise, core faculty will review the available information and meet with the student to gain their perspective. Based on this review, faculty members address specific concerns with the individual student and adhere to the guidelines and policies of the program to assist the student in addressing the areas of concern. If the core faculty determine that the student should not continue in the Graduate Counseling program, the student is informed of this decision along with the rationale and supporting evidence. Students are afforded due process throughout the decision-making process. At the conclusion of the process, one of several courses of action may be taken. One option is that the student will be allowed to elect to withdraw or discontinue enrollment. A second possibility is that the student is advised that academic dismissal has been voted on by action of the faculty and that further enrollment will not be permitted. A third option is that the student is advised that specific corrective steps must be taken (e.g., treatment for chemical dependency, counseling for particular counter-transference response, etc.) and that either probation status will be assigned or attendance will be suspended until the successful remediation of the problematic behavior has been completed. In theses cases, the appeal procedure is the same as for academic probation and dismissal as outlined earlier in this catalog.

Practicum and Internship Experience

All students are required to complete both a practicum and an internship during the last year of their program. Completion of clinical hours (practicum and internship) must occur primarily during daytime working hours. Applicants and students are advised that work or life scheduling changes will be necessary in order to complete these degree requirements.

The Theory of Counseling Paper

The “My Theory of Counseling” Paper remains a hallmark of the Rollins College Graduate Studies in Counseling. Students write this paper during their final year of the program. The final edition reflects the individual’s integration of both theory and practice. Successful completion of this paper is a requirement for graduation.

The Master Therapist Series

The Master Therapist Series is conducted during the final year of the program when students are completing internship. Three eminent scholar-practitioners are invited to conduct full-day workshops, traditionally scheduled on three Saturdays, during the months of September to February, with an occasional exception in scheduling. The presentations are designed to integrate theoretical and practical perspectives of the curriculum. The Master Therapist Series is offered as a capstone experience and must be attended by all students in their final year. It is offered on a cost-free, no-credit basis. Successful completion of a post-workshop learning assessment is required and evaluated by the faculty. The Master Therapist Series is offered in lieu of a comprehensive examination; therefore, successful completion is a graduation requirement.

Graduation Requirements

Graduation requirements include the following:

  • Documentation of required ten (10) individual counseling sessions.
  • Attendance at one meeting of the Florida Licensure Board of Clinical Social Work, Marriage & Family Therapy, & Mental Health Counseling.
  • Completion of all course requirements for the degree with a minimum grade point average of “B” (3.0).
  • Completion of PSY 680 , PSY 690 , and PSY 695  with a grade of B- or higher.
  • Successful completion of the Master Therapist Series attendance and requirement.
  • Successful completion of the My Theory of Counseling paper
  • Filing an Intent to Graduate form.
  • Payment of the $75 graduation fee.
  • Payment of any outstanding fees due to the College.
  • Recommendation by the faculty.

Commencement is held once each year in the spring. All degrees are awarded pursuant to the policies of the Board of Trustees of Rollins College.